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Maryland Workers Compensation Statistics

   Work Place Injuries In Maryland- The who, what, where?

 Each year thousands of Maryland workers are subject to the Workers’ Compensation laws and entitlements.  In 2015 there were 23,711 workers compensation claims filed with the Maryland Workers Compensation Commission.   This number is significant however it only reflects the claims filed with the state and does not account for the amount of work place injuries that took place last year.  The number of unreported injuries could be substantial if you consider that many cases are simply filed with the Workers Compensation Insurer and not the Maryland Workers Compensation Commission.  There is also a significant number of cases that are not reported to the insurer or the Commission and the injured worker simply uses their health insurance.

For a free consultation contact Maryland workers compensation attorney Andrew Rodabaugh +1 (410) 937-1659     OR         Email

 

Who is filing the claims

      It is interesting to note, and provides some extra incite on my prior post that Maryland Colleges and Schools account for 1,641 claims filed with the Workers Compensation Commission in 2015.  This is the third highest amount of claims in any industry within Maryland.  Significantly more claims were filed by policemen and security at 2,309.  This is not surprising considering the occupation requires them to place them selves physically in harms way a great majority of the time.  Coming in at 1,126 filed claims was hospital employees.  This may sound surprising to many however considering that much of the staff is required to physically move patients on a  regular basis it is easy to imagine back strains and shoulder strains occurring quite often.

     Work injuries among men account for approximately 61.8% of the Maryland workers compensation claims filed in 2015.  This statistic could stand for a number of reason.  Occupations that have a higher risk of injury could generally be held by men, there could be a larger number of men in the work force than their are women, or perhaps women are just not as prone to being injured.

What body parts are injured

Some Doctors can be quoted as stating that 80 percent of adults have back pain at some time in their life.  Given this statistic it is not surprising the most common injury among Maryland workers was the low back in 2015 amounting to 26% or 2,062 of the total workers compensation claims.  There was a total of 1,344 shoulder injuries, 1,198 knee injuries, 780 neck injuries, 547 hand injuries, 465 leg injuries, and 432 spinal cord injuries.

A close look at these statistics indicates that there may be some overlapping body parts but further investigation into the statistical study would need to be conducted.  The statistics indicate 2,062 back injuries but also indicate 432 spinal cord injuries.  It is possible that a person injured their back and also their spinal cord and it is also possible to consider a person hurt their knee as well as their leg.

These statistics were gathered from workers compensation permanency awards and do not reflect the total number of injuries, but the total number of injuries where compensation was obtained in Maryland.

Where are the claims filed

Baltimore County has the highest rate of workers compensation claims being filed among any jurisdiction in the state but is followed by a close second place with 3,754.  These numbers do not seem to consider number of employees in each jurisdiction.  It is interesting to note that Baltimore City, Baltimore County, PG County, Montgomery County, Anne Arundel County, and Harford County all account for 68.4 percent of all the work injury claims filed last year.  This means that 6 of 24 counties make up almost three quarters of all claims filed in 2015.

Follow the LINK for a comprehensive view of statistics which have been gathered by the Maryland Workers Compensation Commission

For legal Help with your Maryland workers compensation case call Attorney Andrew Rodabaugh

+1 (410) 937-1659   OR         Email

 

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